Coronavirus (COVID-19) Preparedness Information

Our hospital is committed to providing the highest quality care and ensuring the safety of our patients, employees, providers, volunteers and visitors. We are continuing to monitor the evolving situation with the coronavirus (COVID-19) and are taking the necessary steps to ensure we are fully prepared to care for patients, in accordance with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and in partnership with our local and state health departments.

Below are a number of resources to help educate you and your family on COVID-19. For more information on the virus, please contact the health department.

COVID-19 Online Risk Assessment

To help support the health of our community, we are providing access to an online COVID-19 risk assessment developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This tool does NOT provide a diagnosis, and it should NOT be used as a substitute for an assessment made by a healthcare provider.

Quick Links:

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov)
  • Utah Department of Health
  • TriCounty Health Department
  • Ashley Regional Medical Center COVID-19 line: 435.781.6807 (If you have recently traveled from an area with widespread or ongoing community spread of COVID-19 or if you develop a cough, fever or other symptoms consistent with a respiratory illness.) 

Visitor Restrictions, Limited Entry Points, and Other Precautionary Measures

January 19, 2021

Press Release: Ashley Regional Medical Center is proud to offer bamlanivimab therapy, a new monoclonal antibody treatment for eligible positive COVID-19 patients.

January 19, 2021

Ashley Regional Medical Center has received a number of questions from our patients about when the COVID-19 vaccine may be available to them. While we are thrilled with the outpouring of interest from our community members in getting vaccinated, it is important to keep in mind that we are following a very specific process that will take time to roll out more broadly. 

At this time, we are focusing on administering COVID-19 vaccines in accordance with prioritization guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the federal government and our state – this includes continuing to vaccinate our own healthcare workers and residents at the care center. We are carefully following the protocols in place and will continue to work closely with TriCounty Health, which is directing vaccine distribution in our community. If you have specific questions on when you may be eligible for the vaccine, please refer to the health department website at TriCountyHealth.com

One key thing you can be doing now is ensure we have the most updated contact information for you on file. We encourage you to message us through the patient portal to confirm your communication preferences. 

We are eager to vaccinate as many individuals as possible and are doing everything we can to ensure a smooth rollout at our facilities and also in our community when the time comes. Once the vaccine is more widely available, we will work with our local and state partners to educate our community on how and where to get vaccinated. Check our website and social media platforms often for immunization plan updates. 

Thank you for your patience and understanding – and for continuing to do your part to help slow the spread of COVID-19 by wearing masks, maintaining social distancing and practicing proper hand hygiene.

January 18, 2021

Ashley Regional Medical Center is pleased to continue offering COVID-19 vaccinations in accordance with prioritization guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the federal government and our state.

We know there are a lot of questions about the emerging COVID-19 vaccines. Our goal is to keep you informed as vaccines are approved and rolled out for our workforce, patients and community in the weeks ahead.

We have created a list of common questions about the COVID-19 vaccines based on current knowledge and understanding. These questions will continue to evolve with time, so we encourage you to check back frequently for the most up-to-date information.

Common Questions about COVID-19 Vaccines:

  1. Who is currently eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine? When will it be available to the general public?

We are in the process of working with the Utah Department of Health for the distribution of the vaccine in accordance with prioritization guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the federal government. Vaccine administration continues with our frontline healthcare workers. As soon as the vaccine becomes more broadly available, we strongly encourage our community to get vaccinated.

  1. The vaccine was produced very quickly. How do I know it is safe?

The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. Safety is the top priority while federal partners work to make the COVID-19 vaccines. Despite what the name may suggest, “Operation Warp Speed” does not mean that manufacturers were able to skip steps or cut corners in the vaccine development process. Instead, after the development of the vaccine, manufacturers took a secured risk and overlapped the study, manufacturing and distribution phases. The FDA committed to giving these vaccinations priority (not rushed) review at all phases of the studies, which helped speed up the overall process. Ongoing monitoring of vaccine effectiveness and side effect reports will continue to be evaluated by the FDA and the manufacturers.

  1. If I get the COVID-19 vaccine, should I still wear a mask?

Yes. For several reasons, a mask and other proven methods of preventing COVID-19 (hand hygiene and social distancing) are still important even after receiving the vaccine. It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it is possible that a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

  1. If I have already had COVID-19 and recovered, should I still get the COVID-19 vaccine when it is available?

Yes, at this time the vaccine is recommended even if you previously tested positive for COVID-19. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that re-infection with COVID-19 is possible, individuals who have previously been infected with COVID-19 should proceed with getting the vaccine. However, due to limited vaccine supply at this time, you may be asked to wait to get the vaccine if you had COVID-19 within the previous 90 days, as the likelihood of reinfection during this time period is likely low.

  1. Can you contract COVID-19 by getting the vaccine?

No. The vaccine is NOT a live vaccine, and it is NOT possible to contract COVID-19 from receiving the vaccine. Some people experience side effects from the vaccine, such as headache, muscle pain, or fever – but that does not mean you have COVID-19.  It means your body is working to build the necessary immunity against the virus, which is a good thing. 

  1. What are the possible side effects/adverse events from the COVID-19 vaccine? 

The most common adverse reactions reported have been fatigue, headache, fever/chills and joint pain. This means your body is working to build the necessary immunity against the virus.

You can read more in Pfizer’s FDA Briefing Document about the side effects reported among the vaccine study participants. 

  1. Can the COVID-19 vaccine be administered to children?

The COVID-19 vaccine is not indicated for children younger than 16 years old at this time.

  1. Can the COVID-19 vaccine be administered to pregnant women?

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that COVID-19 vaccines should not be withheld from pregnant individuals. It is important to note that the COVID-19 vaccines currently available have not been tested in pregnant women, so there is no safety data specific to use in pregnancy. Pregnant women should make an informed decision after discussing with their healthcare provider.

  1. How many doses are required? If multiple, when do I get another dose?

For both the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine, two doses are required. The second dose of the Pfizer vaccine should be administered 21 days after the first dose. The second dose of the Moderna vaccine should be administered 28 days after the first dose. It is very important to note that the second dose must be from the same manufacturer as the first dose. 

  1. What should I do if I am unable to get the second dose exactly 21 days (Pfizer) or 28 days (Moderna) after the first dose?

While it is recommended that you receive the second dose as soon as feasible after day 21 or day 28, we understand that it might not be possible to receive it on the desired date. This could be due to multiple reasons. Please keep the following in mind if you cannot receive the second vaccine dose on the desired date:

  1. You must receive the second dose from the same manufacturer as the first dose.
  2. Get the second dose as soon as possible after the desired date has passed, as it is better to get the second dose late than not at all. You will still experience the same efficacy in the long run, although you may not see the full effect of the immunity until a few weeks after the second dose.  

  1. How long after receiving both doses of the vaccine until it is considered effective?

Similar to the flu vaccine, it typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. That means it’s possible a person could be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection. As a general rule, the vaccine is considered effective about two weeks after the second dose, according to the manufacturers. There is evidence that the first dose will begin providing some immunity, but it is still very important to receive the second dose for optimal results.

  1. Can I choose which vaccine I get (Pfizer or Moderna)?

    We do not recommend waiting for a specific manufacturer. Both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines have similar efficacy and potential side effects, and have shown decreased disease severity in the small numbers of study participants who contracted COVID-19 after receiving the vaccine. Both manufacturers require two doses. It is important to remember that the second dose you receive must be from the same manufacturer. Early defense is better than no defense against COVID-19.
     
  2. Can I choose which vaccine I get (Pfizer or Moderna)?

    We do not recommend waiting for a specific manufacturer. Both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines have similar efficacy and potential side effects, and have shown decreased disease severity in the small numbers of study participants who contracted COVID-19 after receiving the vaccine. Both manufacturers require two doses. It is important to remember that the second dose you receive must be from the same manufacturer. Early defense is better than no defense against COVID-19.
     
  3. How long will I need to be observed after I get the vaccine?

In general, a 30-minute observation period is recommended for anyone with a history of severe allergic reactions (due to any cause), and a 15-minute observation period is recommended for all other individuals.

  1. Will the COVID-19 vaccine result in a false positive COVID-19 test?

No, COVID-19 vaccination will not cause a false positive COVID-19 viral test. Per CDC guidance, the immunity response from a COVID-19 vaccine could possibly result in a positive antibody test, which indicates previous infection and potential protection against the virus.

  1. If I become COVID-19-positive following my first dose of the vaccine, should I take the second dose?

Per CDC guidance, you may receive the vaccine (either dose) following resolution of symptoms, if any, and completion of the quarantine period.

  1. What ingredients are included in the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccine?

Ingredients for the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines can be found via this CDC link. Individuals with allergies to any of the vaccine components should discuss concerns with their healthcare provider before receiving the vaccine.

July 16, 2020

Universal Masking

Ashley Regional Medical Center is taking every precaution to keep our patients and staff safe, and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our facilities. For this reason, we are following the CDC recommendation and local and state guidance that anyone who enters our facility must wear a face mask at all times.

Visitors are encouraged to bring their own mask from home to help conserve hospital supplies for patients and staff.

Why wear a mask? Recent studies show that universal masking, in addition to practicing social distancing and proper hand hygiene, can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19, especially in individuals who may not know they are ill. And until there is a vaccine, these measures are our best line of defense in protecting not only you, but also our healthcare workers and community members.

Please be smart and do your part. Wear a mask! We all have a responsibility to protect one another against the spread of COVID-19 and make our communities healthier.

For more information from the CDC on face coverings and how to make your own, click here.

To learn more about the many ways we are working to ensure your safety while you are in our care, click here.
 

Limited Visitor Guidelines May 2020

COVID-19 masking guidelines

3 to stay covid free image

What Should I Do If I Have Respiratory Illness Symptoms?

symptom chart for respiratory illnesses

Keep healthy year-round from most viruses and other infections (not specific to COVID-19). 

image with infection prevention tactics
 

image of hand washing - says clean hands save lives

Handwashing: What to Know (source: CDC.gov)

image of a person washing their hands